The meaning of the word What does it mean: “adahmeve?” In recent years, in many Western societies, the word marriage has lost its original meaning. People now may not think of a man and a woman when they encounter the word marriage. Yet we do need a word that specifically refers to traditional marriage of a husband and wife, united formally as male and female in a human family. That original formal union deserves to have a word of its own. Now we have it, for adahmeve was created specifically for that. Coming from the names of our first parents, Adam and Eve, with an “h” that  makes it clear that it’s a new word, it cannot be used for anything but marriage between a man and a woman, by definition. The photo on the right (a fiftieth wedding anniversary in California) is not intended to emphasize marriage ceremonies themselves but the continuous relationship between a husband and a wife. The point is not in ceremonies or parties but in the adahmeve union itself, as it reaches into the future. The man and woman need to continue to respect each other and their marriage covenants, for the relationship to last.
Adahmeve
Marriage of a man and a woman — traditional
The word adahmeve comes from Jonathan Whitcomb, who now lives in Murray, Utah, with his wife Gladys (not the couple that is shown here in California)
Adahmeve is a simple concept: a formal family relationship between a woman and a man, yet consider the essence of it. The couple needs to have a successful long-term relationship as wife and husband. Why should we support and promote adahmeve? It is the secure and proven method of both bringing human life into the world and raising children to become valuable members of society. This does not mean that everything always works close to perfection with every individual in every admevial relationship, of course. Nor does it mean that children will always meet all the expectations that their parents have for them. But we know that this kind of family relationship can, at least some of the time, have extremely satisfying interpersonal success: true joy in raising a family. “Without adahmeve, this formal union of man and woman, over past centuries, we’d not have any human civilization worth mentioning, of any kind, anywhere on earth, even if humans could avoid extinction while abandoning adahmeve.” (Jonathan Whitcomb)
The right way to bring children into the world: formal adahmeve
In no way should the above reference, to children being born into the world through admevial family relationships, cause anyone to look down on the general principle of adoption. For as long as mortality will last, adopting a child into a family will always be important. Yet the traditional method, children being born from the union of a husband and a wife—that will always be essential. In all human societies that continue to thrive we will eventually observe that adahmeve was and is at the foundation.  Those societies that abandon it will fall apart. Any person who fights against God’s divine gift of adahmeve will find himself or herself devastated, ashamed to stand in the presence of God.
Copyright 2013-2017 Jonathan David Whitcomb
The noun is pronounced uh-’dah-meev.  The verb “admeve” is pronounced uhd- ’meev, and the adjective “admevial,” uhd-’meev-ee-uhl (related to “marital”)
Adahmeve
Marriage of a man and a woman — traditional
The word adahmeve comes from Jonathan Whitcomb, who now lives in Murray, Utah, with his wife Gladys (not the couple that is shown here in California)
The meaning of the word What does it mean: “adahmeve?” In recent years, in many Western societies, the word marriage has lost its original meaning. People now may not think of a man and a woman when they encounter the word marriage. Yet we do need a word that specifically refers to traditional marriage of a husband and wife, united formally as male and female in a human family. That original formal union deserves to have a word of its own. Now we have it, for adahmeve was created specifically for that. Coming from the names of our first parents, Adam and Eve, with an “h” that  makes it clear that it’s a new word, it cannot be used for anything but marriage between a man and a woman, by definition. The photo on the right (a fiftieth wedding anniversary in California) is not intended to emphasize marriage ceremonies themselves but the continuous relationship between a husband and a wife. The point is not in ceremonies or parties but in the adahmeve union itself, as it reaches into the future. The man and woman need to continue to respect each other and their marriage covenants, for the relationship to last.
Adahmeve is a simple concept: a formal family relationship between a woman and a man, yet consider the essence of it. The couple needs to have a suc- cessful long-term relationship as wife and husband. Why should we support and promote adahmeve? It is the secure and proven method of both bringing human life into the world and raising children to become valuable members of society.
The right way to bring children into the world: formal adahmeve
This does not mean that everything always works close to perfection with every individual in every admevial relationship, of course. Nor does it mean that children will always meet all the expectations that their parents have for them. But we know that this kind of family relationship can, at least some of the time, have extremely satisfying interpersonal success: true joy in raising a family. “Without adahmeve, this formal union of man and woman, over past centuries, we’d not have any human civilization worth mentioning, of any kind, anywhere on earth, even if humans could avoid extinction while abandoning adahmeve.” (Jonathan Whitcomb) In no way should the above reference, to children being born into the world through admevial family relationships, cause anyone to look down on the general principle of adoption. For as long as mortality will last, adopting a child into a family will always be important. Yet the traditional method, children being born from the union of a husband and a wife—that will always be essential. In all human societies that continue to thrive we will eventually observe that adahmeve was and is at the foundation.  Those societies that abandon it will fall apart. Any person who fights against God’s divine gift of adahmeve will find himself or herself devastated, ashamed to stand in the presence of God.
The noun is pronounced uh-’dah-meev.  The verb “admeve” is pronounced uhd- ’meev, and the adjective “admevial,” uhd-’meev-ee-uhl (related to “marital”)
Copyright 2013-2017 Jonathan David Whitcomb